Ireland Expands EPR Scheme to Include All Tyre Categories from 2025

The Republic of Ireland has announced the extension of its Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) scheme to encompass all tyre categories, including those from buses, trucks, agricultural, construction, and industrial waste tyres, starting 1 January 2025. This expansion marks a critical step in Ireland's journey towards achieving a circular economy and meeting stringent waste management objectives.

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Published on
February 8, 2024

Comprehensive Waste Management

The EPR scheme, currently focused on managing end-of-life passenger car, 4x4, van, and motorcycle tyres, is set to broaden its reach. This initiative is aimed at ensuring the environmentally sound management of a wider range of waste tyres. Governed by the principle of 'producer pays', the scheme mandates tyre producers and industry stakeholders to take responsibility for the lifecycle of their products, promoting the reuse, recycling, and recovery of waste tyres.

Operated by Repak ELT, Ireland's compliance scheme for tyres requires mandatory membership from all tyre producers and related economic operators. The scheme is funded through a visible Environmental Management Cost (vEMC), a fee that underpins efforts to maximise the sustainable handling of waste tyres.

Beyond Tyres: A Look at Other EPR Schemes

Ireland's commitment to a circular economy extends beyond tyres, with EPR schemes already established for packaging waste, Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE), batteries, end-of-life vehicles (ELVs), and farm plastics. Like the tyre scheme, these initiatives are based on the 'producer pays' principle, ensuring producers are accountable for the environmental management of waste generated from their products. These schemes are crucial for Ireland to meet both domestic and European Union waste management targets.

Penalties for Non-compliance

The Irish government enforces stringent penalties for non-compliance with EPR regulations across all waste streams. For instance, violations of WEEE regulations can attract penalties up to €500,000, three years imprisonment, or both. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) also issues Fixed Payment Notices (FPNs) for offences, with fines ranging from €500 to €2,000. While specific penalties for non-compliance with tyre regulations are not detailed, the framework implies robust enforcement measures to ensure industry adherence.

Moving Forward

This expansion of the EPR scheme to include all tyre categories signifies Ireland's proactive approach to waste management and environmental protection. By integrating a broader spectrum of tyres into the EPR framework, Ireland takes a significant stride towards the realization of a circular economy, setting a commendable example for sustainable waste management practices globally. The initiative not only underscores the importance of producer responsibility in waste management but also reinforces Ireland's commitment to achieving its environmental targets in line with European Union directives.

Q&A on Ireland's Expanded EPR Scheme for Tyres

What is the Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) scheme in Ireland?
The EPR scheme in Ireland is a regulatory framework based on the 'producer pays' principle, requiring producers and industry stakeholders to manage the environmental impact of waste from their products. It covers various waste streams, including tyres, to promote the reuse, recycling, and recovery of waste materials.

What changes are being made to the EPR scheme for tyres in Ireland?
From 1 January 2025, Ireland's EPR scheme for tyres will be extended to include all tyre categories, such as those from buses, trucks, agricultural, construction, and industrial waste tyres. This expansion aims at enabling the environmentally sound management of these additional tyre categories.

Who operates the EPR scheme for tyres in Ireland?
The Irish compliance scheme for tyres is operated by Repak ELT. It requires all tyre producers and other economic operators in the tyre industry to be members of this compulsory compliance scheme.

How is the EPR scheme for tyres funded?
The scheme is funded by a visible Environmental Management Cost (vEMC), which is a charge applied to manage the scheme and support the reuse, recycling, and recovery of waste tyres.

What other waste streams are covered by EPR schemes in Ireland?
In addition to tyres, Ireland has EPR schemes for packaging waste, Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE), batteries, end-of-life vehicles (ELVs), and farm plastics.

What are the penalties for non-compliance with the EPR scheme?
Penalties for non-compliance vary across different waste streams. For example, WEEE regulations non-compliance can result in penalties up to €500,000, imprisonment for up to three years, or both. Fixed Payment Notices (FPNs) for various offences can also be issued, with fines ranging from €500 to €2,000.

What is the goal of expanding the EPR scheme for tyres?
The goal of expanding the EPR scheme for tyres is to ensure the environmentally sound management of all tyre categories, supporting Ireland's transition towards a circular economy and achieving its waste management and environmental targets.


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